Identifying (and getting rid of) spring weeds


Identifying (and getting rid of) spring weeds

By Nathan Brandon, founder of Pure Green Lawn Care

Warm weather brings out a few of everyone’s favorite things: the smell of freshly mowed grass, daffodils, songbirds … and weeds.

Warm weather brings out a few of everyone’s favorite things: the smell of freshly mowed grass, daffodils, songbirds … and weeds.

Now that we’ve seen the first few waves of 60-degree weather and sunshine, weeds are popping left and right. Identifying and taking them out early is key to a lush summer yard prime for barbeques.

One of the main weeds we are seeing right now is henbit, a winter annual weed that can grow up to 16 inches tall. Identify them by the square stems, pink and purple flowers and dark green leaves and have scalloped edges.

Another common nuisance is wild onion. Although it is a winter perennial, it sprouts up in the spring, March and April to be specific. It grows 8 to 12 inches tall with leaves that appear directly from the bulb and looks similar to wild garlic. Both wild onion and wild garlic have thin, green, waxy leaves. But here’s how to tell them apart – the leaves of wild garlic are round and hollow and those of wild onion are flat and solid.

Finally, the infamous dandelion is sure to create trouble this year. Dandelion is a hardy perennial that grows individually on hollow flower stalks 2 to 18 inches tall and has lance-shaped leaves are 3 to 12 inches long. You can identify these weeds by either the yellow 1 to 2 inch composite flower or by the seed-head (also known as the white puffy carrier of dandelion doom), which appear after the yellow flower.

So how do you get rid of these pesky wildflowers? Like most weeds, these three can be pulled up. Pull them before they get a chance to set seed. Many weeds will grow and set seed multiple times a growing season. At Pure Green, we also recommend spot treating with a post-emergent herbicide. If you choose to pull wild onion, be sure to get the entire plant. Any fragment left behind will regenerate and grow.

A happy healthy turf is always the best defense against weeds. Make sure you are mowing at the right height, watering and fertilizing appropriately.

What weed is coming next? The Forsythia bush is blooming, which means it’s time to apply pre-emergent herbicide to deter weeds like crabgrass.

Nathan Brandon is the founder and CEO of Franklin-based lawn care company Pure Green. With 20 years of experience in the field, the lawn care enthusiast and his team use environmentally friendly methods, organic based products and excellent customer service to provide care to homes all over the greater Nashville area.

Warm weather brings out a few of everyone’s favorite things: the smell of freshly mowed grass, daffodils, songbirds … and weeds.

Now that we’ve seen the first few waves of 60-degree weather and sunshine, weeds are popping left and right. Identifying and taking them out early is key to a lush summer yard prime for barbeques.

One of the main weeds we are seeing right now is henbit, a winter annual weed that can grow up to 16 inches tall. Identify them by the square stems, pink and purple flowers and dark green leaves and have scalloped edges.

Another common nuisance is wild onion. Although it is a winter perennial, it sprouts up in the spring, March and April to be specific. It grows 8 to 12 inches tall with leaves that appear directly from the bulb and looks similar to wild garlic. Both wild onion and wild garlic have thin, green, waxy leaves. But here’s how to tell them apart – the leaves of wild garlic are round and hollow and those of wild onion are flat and solid.

Finally, the infamous dandelion is sure to create trouble this year. Dandelion is a hardy perennial that grows individually on hollow flower stalks 2 to 18 inches tall and has lance-shaped leaves are 3 to 12 inches long. You can identify these weeds by either the yellow 1 to 2 inch composite flower or by the seed-head (also known as the white puffy carrier of dandelion doom), which appear after the yellow flower.

So how do you get rid of these pesky wildflowers? Like most weeds, these three can be pulled up. Pull them before they get a chance to set seed. Many weeds will grow and set seed multiple times a growing season. At Pure Green, we also recommend spot treating with a post-emergent herbicide. If you choose to pull wild onion, be sure to get the entire plant. Any fragment left behind will regenerate and grow.

A happy healthy turf is always the best defense against weeds. Make sure you are mowing at the right height, watering and fertilizing appropriately.

What weed is coming next? The Forsythia bush is blooming, which means it’s time to apply pre-emergent herbicide to deter weeds like crabgrass.

Nathan Brandon is the founder and CEO of Franklin-based lawn care company Pure Green. With 20 years of experience in the field, the lawn care enthusiast and his team use environmentally friendly methods, organic based products and excellent customer service to provide care to homes all over the greater Nashville area.

About The Author

Kelly Gilfillan is the owner-publisher of Home Page Media Group which has been publishing hyperlocal news since 2009.

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