Oversized Casada campaign signs ordered removed


Oversized Casada campaign signs ordered removed

At least four campaign signs promoting District 63 State House Rep. Glen Casada, who is running this year against Cherie Hammond for re-election, have been removed for violating temporary sign regulations.

At least four campaign signs promoting District 63 State House Rep. Glen Casada, who is running this year against Cherie Hammond for re-election, have been removed for violating temporary sign regulations.

A spokesperson with the Williamson County codes department said Casada’s campaigners have removed two signs that exceeded regulatory size, and a homeowner took down a third.

Temporary signs on nonresidential property in unincorporated parts of Williamson County are not to exceed 16 square feet or 6 feet in height. Regulations allow a maximum of five signs per parcel not to exceed a total of 30 square feet.    

“One was on Clovercroft Road and one was on Liberty Pike right next to McKay’s Mill. The other [removed by the homeowner] was by Murfreesboro Road in Arrington,†said the spokesperson, who wished to remain nameless.

“There was one other called in, but that was in the city of Franklin.â€

Casada’s signs were reportedly double the permitted maximum size.

The department was alerted about the signs through anonymous phone calls, which are how most complaints of that nature are received, the representative said, adding that the department has not received calls regarding any other candidates’ signs.

Another county regulation prohibits political signs on public road right-of-ways on unincorporated county property, excluding property under county school board jurisdiction.

Each municipality within the county has its own similar ordinances surrounding campaign signs. Temporary signs must be no more than six feet in height or exceed 32 square feet per side in the city of Franklin, where one Casada sign was ordered taken down on Wilson Pike.

“We had one complaint in the last week about the size of the sign,†City Administrator Eric Stuckey said Thursday. “What we had to do is notify the property owner of the concern, and they have the opportunity to correct it. In this case, it was on private property. If the sign is placed in a public right-of-way, we can act more directly in removing it.â€

Stuckey said property owners are given seven days to remove signs that aren’t regulation. From discussions with the Franklin codes director, Stuckey said he is not aware of any other complaints regarding political signs.

“During the campaign season, you usually get a few [instances] like these,†he said.

All issues related to political signs are addressed by county and municipal codes departments; the county election commission has no jurisdiction over signs, though state statute prohibits signs within 100 feet of an election poll entrance.

Jessica Pace covers Williamson County, Williamson County Schools and the Town of Nolensville for BrentWord Communications. Contact her at jess@brentwoodhomepage.com or follow her on Twitter @Jess_Marie_Pace.

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