Spring Hill officials narrow down funding for local nonprofits to $25,000 during budget meeting


Spring Hill officials narrow down funding for local nonprofits to $25,000 during budget meeting

By ALEXANDER WILLIS

During the first of this year’s annual series of budget meetings, the Spring Hill Board of Mayor and Aldermen narrowed down and specified the funds it would allocated to local nonprofits, which totaled in the amount of $25,000.

During the 2018-19 fiscal year, Spring Hill donated a total of $17,500 across seven different nonprofit organizations, with the highest recipients being the Spring Hill Arts Center; an organization that promotes the arts in the community through classes and workshops, and The Well Outreach; a local food pantry that assists under served youth, with both receiving $5,000 last fiscal year.

PHOTO: The Board of Mayor and Aldermen along with the city administrators and finance director deliberate on funding for nonprofits Tuesday. / Photo by Alexander Willis

For this new fiscal year, local nonprofits had collectively requested $32,250. As a previously passed resolution limits the maximum amount the city can allot to nonprofits to $25,000, city leaders began the arduous process of deciding who gets what.

The Tennessee Rehabilitation Center, which offers various programs all designed to prepare its clients for employment, such as those with disabilities, received $2,000 from the city last fiscal year, but requested $5,000 for this fiscal year. The board eventually settled on allotting the previous amount of $2,000 again for this fiscal year.

The Tennessee Children’s Home received $1,000 from the city last fiscal year, but had also requested $5,000 this fiscal year, primarily for its annual Turkey Burn Half-Marathon, its premiere fundraising event. Eventually, the board decided on budgeting that number down to $2,750.

The Spring Hill Arts Center, the city’s oldest arts nonprofit organization, had received $5,000 from the city last fiscal year, and requested that amount to remain the same this fiscal year. Ultimately, the board stuck with the $5,000 figure for this upcoming year.

The Well Outreach fared identically to the Spring Hill Arts Center, receiving $5,000 last fiscal year and maintaining that amount for this fiscal year.

The Maury County Senior Center, which serves offers programs to seniors and was dedicated nearly 40 years ago, received $4,500 last fiscal year, and requested that amount be increased to $5,000 this fiscal year. The board decided on keeping that number as it was, allotting $4,500 to the nonprofit for this fiscal year.

And lastly, two new requests made their way to the board’s desks this fiscal year; the Boys and Girls Club of Maury County, and Rise Up, Tennessee. Opening in 1999, The Boys and Girls Club of Maury County is a youth service organization that life-enhancing and character development programs to youth in need. Formed in 2017, Rise Up, Tennessee serves incarcerated women in Maury County jail through recovery and rehabilitation programs.

The Boys and Girls Club of Maury County, for the first time, requested from the city $3,500, which the board ultimately agreed on and allotted for that amount.

Rise Up, Tennessee on the other hand, was believed by the board not to fit the requirements to receive a donation, as per the language of the requirements, the organization has “to benefit the general welfare of the residents of the city year round,” as relayed by the city’s Finance Director Patti Amorello. Ultimately, the board decided against granted the requested funds, netting the total amount allotted to nonprofits for this fiscal year to an even $25,000.

The next city budget meeting will be held on Tuesday, April 16, and is open to the public. The meeting will be held at City Hall, located at 199 Town Center Parkway.

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